High fructose consumption with a high-protein meal is associated with decreased glycemia and increased thermogenesis but reduced fat oxidation: A randomized controlled trial

High fructose consumption with a high-protein meal is associated with decreased glycemia and increased thermogenesis but reduced fat oxidation: A randomized controlled trial
Title:
High fructose consumption with a high-protein meal is associated with decreased glycemia and increased thermogenesis but reduced fat oxidation: A randomized controlled trial
Other Titles:
Nutrition
Keywords:
Publication Date:
20 July 2018
Citation:
Camps SG, Koh HR, Wang NX, Henry CJ. High fructose consumption with a high-protein meal is associated with decreased glycemia and increased thermogenesis but reduced fat oxidation: A randomized controlled trial. Nutrition. 2019;58:77‐82. doi:10.1016/j.nut.2018.06.024
Abstract:
Objectives: Fructose is often recommended due to its ability to lower glycemic response and its increased thermogenic effect. Additionally, proteins can reduce the glycemic response of carbohydrate-rich foods and have a high diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT). The aim of this study was to investigate whether the inclusion of fructose in a high-protein meal would demonstrate metabolic advantages. Methods: Nineteen Asian women (body mass index 17–28 kg/m2) consumed a low-glycemic index (GI; fructose) or high GI (glucose), high-protein breakfast followed by a standardized lunch in a randomized crossover design. Simultaneously, 8-h continuous glucose monitoring provided incremental area under the curve (iAUC) and 4-h indirect calorimetry provided DIT and respiratory quotient (RQ). Results: The low GI diet resulted in a lower glucose iAUC (135 ± 25 versus 212 ± 23 mmol/L, P < 0.05) following breakfast, but no second-meal effect after the standardized lunch (217 ± 37 versus 228 ± 27 mmol/L, P < 0.05) compared with the high GI diet. Furthermore, 4-h DIT was greater (40.6 ± 2.3 versus 34.9 ± 1.8 kcal, P < 0.05) and RQ was increased after the fructose high-protein breakfast (0.047 ± 0.009 versus 0.028 ± 0.009, P < 0.05) compared with the glucose meal. Conclusions: Fructose is an effective sweetener in reducing glycemia and increasing DIT in the presence of a high-protein diet. However, the reduced fat oxidation after high fructose consumption might present a risk for increased lipogenesis.
License type:
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Funding Info:
This research is supported by Human Nutritional Sciences Research; A*STAR BMRC Strategic Positioning Fund (SPF); SFP2013/003
Description:
ISSN:
0899-9007
1873-1244
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