Implicit satiety goals and food-related expectations predict portion size in older adults: Findings from the BAMMBE cohort

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Implicit satiety goals and food-related expectations predict portion size in older adults: Findings from the BAMMBE cohort
Title:
Implicit satiety goals and food-related expectations predict portion size in older adults: Findings from the BAMMBE cohort
Journal Title:
Appetite
Publication Date:
02 November 2022
Citation:
Pink, A. E., Lee, L. L., Low, D. Y., Yang, Y., Fong, L. Z., Kang, A. Y. H., Liu, P., Kim, H., Wang, Y., Padmanabhan, P., Cobiac, L., Gulyás, B., Pettersson, S., & Cheon, B. K. (2023). Implicit satiety goals and food-related expectations predict portion size in older adults: Findings from the BAMMBE cohort. Appetite, 180, 106361. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2022.106361
Abstract:
Portion size selection is an indicator of appetite and within younger adults, is predicted by factors such as expected satiety, liking and motivations to achieve an ideal sensation of fullness (i.e., implicit satiety goals). Currently, there is limited research available on the determinants of portion size selection within older adults. Therefore, the current study aimed to examine the relationship between individual differences in implicit satiety goals, food-related expectations, and portion size selection in older adults. Free-living older adult Singaporeans (N =115; Nmales=62; age: M=66.21 years, SD=4.78, range=60-83years) participated as part of the Brain, Ageing, Microbiome, Muscle, Bone, and Exercise Study (BAMMBE). Participants completed questionnaires on their subjective requirements for experiencing different states of satiety and food-related expectations (i.e., liking, how filling) as well as a computerised portion size selection task. Using a multiple regression, we found that goals to feel comfortably full (B=3.08, SE=1.04, t=2.96, p=.004) and to stop hunger (B=-2.25, SE=.82, t=-2.75, p=.007) significantly predicted larger portion size selection (R2=.24, F(4,87)=6.74, p<.001). Larger portion sizes (R2=.53, F(5,90)=20.58, p<.001) were also predicted by greater expected satiety (B=.47, SE=.09, t=5.15, p<.001) and lower perceptions of how filling foods are (B=-2.92, SE=.77, t=-3.79, p<.001) but not liking (B=-.09, SE=.91, t=-.10, p=.925) or frequency (B=-18.42, SE=16.91, t=-1.09, p=.279) of consumption of target foods. Comparing our findings to results of studies conducted with younger adults suggests the influence of factors such as satiety related goals on portion size selection may change with ageing while the influence of other factors (e.g., expected satiety/fullness delivered by foods) may remain consistent with ageing. These findings may inform future strategies to increase/decrease portion size accordingly to ensure older adults maintain an appropriate healthy weight.
License type:
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
Funding Info:
This work was supported by the Ageing Research Institute for Society and Education (NTU-ARISE grants 2017/15 and 2017/16) and Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine at Nanyang Technological University (NTU), and NTU-CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation) Precision Health and Health Technologies Seed Fund, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIFAR), National Neuroscience Institute and Sunway University.

This work received support from NTU Nanyang Assistant Professorship (NAP) grant (M4081643).
Description:
ISSN:
0195-6663
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