Evaluation of preconception dietary patterns among women enrolled in a multi-site study

Page view(s)
6
Checked on Nov 03, 2022
Evaluation of preconception dietary patterns among women enrolled in a multi-site study
Title:
Evaluation of preconception dietary patterns among women enrolled in a multi-site study
Other Titles:
Current Developments in Nutrition
Publication Date:
25 June 2022
Citation:
Lim, S. X., Cox, V., Rodrigues, N., Colega, M. T., Barton, S. J., Childs, C. E., Conlon, C. A., Wall, C. R., Cutfield, W. S., Chan, S.-Y., Godfrey, K. M., & Chong, M. F.-F. (2022). Evaluation of preconception dietary patterns among women enrolled in a multi-site study. Current Developments in Nutrition. https://doi.org/10.1093/cdn/nzac106
Abstract:
Abstract Background Diet indices are widely used in nutritional research across communities but do not “capture” the full extent of diet variability across multiple countries. Empirically-derived dietary patterns can provide additional information as they reflect combinations of foods potentially associated with health outcomes. Limited studies have evaluated preconception dietary patterns among heterogeneous populations. Objectives In the multi-site NiPPeR study, secondary aims included: (1) derive pooled and site-specific preconception dietary patterns, and (2) evaluate these patterns using anthropometric measures and metabolic biomarkers. Methods Women planning pregnancy (n = 1720) in the United Kingdom, Singapore and New Zealand completed interviewer-administered harmonized food-frequency and lifestyle questionnaires at recruitment. Across-cohort (“pooled”) and site-specific dietary patterns were derived, and associations between dietary pattern scores and BMI, waist to hip ratio, plasma lipids and glycemia assessed using multivariable linear regression, expressing results as standard deviation change in outcome per standard deviation change in dietary pattern score. Results The pooled analysis identified three dietary patterns: ‘Vegetables/Fruits/Nuts’ (‘Healthy’), ‘Fried potatoes/Processed meat/Sweetened beverages’ (‘Less Healthy’) and ‘Fish/Poultry/Noodles/Rice’ (‘Mixed’). The ‘Healthy’ and ‘Less Healthy’ pooled pattern scores were highly correlated with their corresponding site-specific dietary pattern scores (‘Healthy’: ρ = 0.87–0.93, ‘Less Healthy’: ρ = 0.65–0.88). Women with higher scores for the ‘Healthy’ pooled pattern had a lower waist to hip ratio [Standardized beta (95% CI): -0.10 (-0.18, -0.01)]; those with higher scores for the ‘Less Healthy’ pooled pattern had a higher BMI [0.17 (0.09, 0.24)], higher LDL cholesterol [0.10 (0.01, 0.19)] and less optimal glucose profiles. However, we noted higher adherence to the ‘Healthy’ pooled pattern with higher BMI. Conclusions The ‘Healthy’ and ‘Less Healthy’ pooled patterns were comparable to the corresponding site-specific patterns. While the associations between these patterns and objective anthropometric/metabolic measures were largely in the expected directions, future studies are required to confirm these findings. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02509988).
License type:
Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)
Funding Info:
This research / project is supported by the National Medical Research Council - Translational and Clinical Research (TCR) Flagship Program
Grant Reference no. : NMRC/TCR/012-NUHS/2014

This research / project is supported by the National University of Singapore (NUS) and the Agency of Science, Technology and Research - Growth, Development and Metabolism Programme of the Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences
Grant Reference no. : H17/01/a0/005

This research / project is supported by the National Medical Research Council (NMRC) - Clinician Scientist Award
Grant Reference no. : NMRC/CSA-INV/0010/2016

Overseas Funding:- 1)UK Medical Research Council, MRC award to the MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit (MC_UU_12011/4) 2) Gravida, a New Zealand Government Centre of Research Excellence. 3) Nestec SA under a Research Agreement with the University of Southampton, Auckland UniServices Ltd, SICS, National University Hospital Singapore PTE Ltd and NUS. 4) National Institute for Health Research (NIHR Senior Investigator (NF-SI-0515-10042), NIHR Southampton 1000DaysPlus Global Nutrition Research Group (17/63/154) and NIHR Southampton Biomedical Research Centre (IS-BRC-1215-20004)), 5) British Heart Foundation (RG/15/17/3174) 6) European Union (Erasmus+ Programme Early Nutrition eAcademy Southeast Asia-573651-EPP-1-2016-1-DE-EPPKA2-CBHE-JP and ImpENSA 598488-EPP-1-2018-1-DE-EPPKA2-CBHE-JP).
Description:
This is the version of record an article accepted for publication in Current Developments in Nutrition following peer review. The version of record Lim, S. X., Cox, V., Rodrigues, N., Colega, M. T., Barton, S. J., Childs, C. E., Conlon, C. A., Wall, C. R., Cutfield, W. S., Chan, S.-Y., Godfrey, K. M., & Chong, M. F.-F. (2022). Evaluation of preconception dietary patterns among women enrolled in a multi-site study. Current Developments in Nutrition. https://doi.org/10.1093/cdn/nzac106 is available online at: https://academic.oup.com/cdn/article/6/7/nzac106/6617883?login=false and doi.org/10.1093/cdn/nzac106
ISSN:
2475-2991