Magnetic Particle Imaging: An Emerging Modality with Prospects in Diagnosis, Targeting and Therapy of Cancer

Page view(s)
20
Checked on Oct 03, 2022
Magnetic Particle Imaging: An Emerging Modality with Prospects in Diagnosis, Targeting and Therapy of Cancer
Title:
Magnetic Particle Imaging: An Emerging Modality with Prospects in Diagnosis, Targeting and Therapy of Cancer
Other Titles:
Cancers
Publication Date:
21 October 2021
Citation:
Tay, Z. W., Chandrasekharan, P., Fellows, B. D., Arrizabalaga, I. R., Yu, E., Olivo, M., & Conolly, S. M. (2021). Magnetic Particle Imaging: An Emerging Modality with Prospects in Diagnosis, Targeting and Therapy of Cancer. Cancers, 13(21), 5285. doi:10.3390/cancers13215285
Abstract:
Background: Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is an emerging imaging modality for quantitative direct imaging of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION or SPIO). With different physics from MRI, MPI benefits from ideal image contrast with zero background tissue signal. This enables clear visualization of cancer with image characteristics similar to PET or SPECT, but using radiation-free magnetic nanoparticles instead, with infinite-duration reporter persistence in vivo. MPI for cancer imaging: demonstrated months of quantitative imaging of the cancer-related immune response with in situ SPION-labelling of immune cells (e.g., neutrophils, CAR T-cells). Because MPI suffers absolutely no susceptibility artifacts in the lung, immuno-MPI could soon provide completely noninvasive early-stage diagnosis and treatment monitoring of lung cancers. MPI for magnetic steering: MPI gradients are ~150 × stronger than MRI, enabling remote magnetic steering of magneto-aerosol, nanoparticles, and catheter tips, enhancing therapeutic delivery by magnetic means. MPI for precision therapy: gradients enable focusing of magnetic hyperthermia and magnetic-actuated drug release with up to 2 mm precision. The extent of drug release from the magnetic nanocarrier can be quantitatively monitored by MPI of SPION’s MPS spectral changes within the nanocarrier. Conclusion: MPI is a promising new magnetic modality spanning cancer imaging to guided-therapy.
License type:
Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
Funding Info:
This research / project is supported by the A*STAR - 1st Career Development Award
Grant Reference no. : 202D800036

This research / project is supported by the National Institutes of Health - In Vivo Therapeutic Cell Tracking by Advanced Magnetic Particle Imaging
Grant Reference no. : NIH1R01EB024578-03

This research / project is supported by the National Institutes of Health - In Vivo Therapeutic Cell Tracking by Advanced Magnetic Particle Imaging
Grant Reference no. : 3R01EB024578-03S1

This research / project is supported by the National Institutes of Health - R44: Small Business Innovation Research Grant (SBIR)
Grant Reference no. : R44EB029877-01A1

This research / project is supported by the National Institutes of Health - Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) for Functional Brain Imaging in Humans
Grant Reference no. : 1R24MH106053-01
Description:
ISSN:
2072-6694