Immunological corollary of the pulmonary mycobiome in bronchiectasis: the CAMEB study

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Immunological corollary of the pulmonary mycobiome in bronchiectasis: the CAMEB study
Title:
Immunological corollary of the pulmonary mycobiome in bronchiectasis: the CAMEB study
Journal Title:
European Respiratory Journal
Keywords:
Publication Date:
27 July 2018
Citation:
Mac Aogáin M, Chandrasekaran R, Lim AYH, et al. Immunological corollary of the pulmonary mycobiome in bronchiectasis: the CAMEB study. Eur Respir J 2018; 52: 1800766 [https://doi. org/10.1183/13993003.00766-2018].
Abstract:
Understanding the composition and clinical importance of the fungal mycobiome was recently identified as a key topic in a “research priorities” consensus statement for bronchiectasis. Patients were recruited as part of the CAMEB study: an international multicentre cross-sectional Cohort of Asian and Matched European Bronchiectasis patients. The mycobiome was determined in 238 patients by targeted amplicon shotgun sequencing of the 18S–28S rRNA internally transcribed spacer regions ITS1 and ITS2. Specific quantitative PCR for detection of and conidial quantification for a range of airway Aspergillus species was performed. Sputum galactomannan, Aspergillus specific IgE, IgG and TARC (thymus and activation regulated chemokine) levels were measured systemically and associated to clinical outcomes. The bronchiectasis mycobiome is distinct and characterised by specific fungal genera, including Aspergillus, Cryptococcus and Clavispora. Aspergillus fumigatus (in Singapore/Kuala Lumpur) and Aspergillus terreus (in Dundee) dominated profiles, the latter associating with exacerbations. High frequencies of Aspergillus-associated disease including sensitisation and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis were detected. Each revealed distinct mycobiome profiles, and associated with more severe disease, poorer pulmonary function and increased exacerbations. The pulmonary mycobiome is of clinical relevance in bronchiectasis. Screening for Aspergillus-associated disease should be considered even in apparently stable patients.
License type:
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Funding Info:
This research is supported by the Singapore Ministry of Health's National Medical Research Council under its Transition Award (NMRC/TA/0048/2016) (S.H. Chotirmall) and the Changi General Hospital Research Grant (CHF2016.03-P) (T.B. Low). The work performed at the National University of Singapore was supported by the Singapore Ministry of Education Academic Research Fund, the Singapore Immunology Network and the National Medical Research Council: N-154-000-038-001, R-154-000-404-112, R-154-000-553-112, R-154-000-565-112, R-154-000-630-112, R-154-000-A08-592, R-154-000-A27-597, SIgN-06-006, SIgN-08-020 and NMRC/1150/2008 (F.T. Chew). J.D. Chalmers is supported by the GSK/British Lung Foundation Chair of Respiratory Research. Funding information for this article has been deposited with the Crossref Funder Registry.
Description:
ISSN:
0903-1936
1399-3003
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