Effect of Maternal Dietary Patterns during Pregnancy on Self-Reported Allergic Diseases in the First 3 Years of Life: Results from the GUSTO Study

Effect of Maternal Dietary Patterns during Pregnancy on Self-Reported Allergic Diseases in the First 3 Years of Life: Results from the GUSTO Study
Title:
Effect of Maternal Dietary Patterns during Pregnancy on Self-Reported Allergic Diseases in the First 3 Years of Life: Results from the GUSTO Study
Other Titles:
International Archives of Allergy and Immunology
Publication Date:
28 June 2017
Citation:
Loo E, X, L, Ong L, Goh A, Chia A, -R, Teoh O, H, Colega M, T, Chan Y, H, Saw S, M, Kwek K, Gluckman P, D, Godfrey K, M, Van Bever H, Lee B, W, Chong Y, S, Chong M, F, -F, Shek L, P: Effect of Maternal Dietary Patterns during Pregnancy on Self-Reported Allergic Diseases in the First 3 Years of Life: Results from the GUSTO Study. Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2017;173:105-113. doi: 10.1159/000475497
Abstract:
Background : Maternal diet during pregnancy has been suggested to be an important early life exposure that influences immune tolerance and the development of allergic diseases in the offspring. Methods: We examined the relation between maternal dietary patterns assessed using 24 hr recalls and food diaries at 26-28 weeks of pregnancy and the subsequent development of allergic outcomes in the offspring in the Growing Up in Singapore Towards Healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) birth cohort. Exploratory factor analysis was used to characterise maternal dietary patterns during pregnancy. During repeated visits in the first 36 months of life, questionnaires were administered to ascertain allergic symptoms, namely, eczema, rhinitis and wheezing. At ages 18 and 36 months, we administered skin prick testing to inhalant and food allergens. Results : Of the three maternal dietary patterns that emerged, the Seafood and Noodle (SfN) pattern was associated with a reduced risk of developing allergen sensitization at both 18 months [odds ratio ( 95% confidence interval): 0.7 (0.5-0.9)] and 36 months [ odds ratio ( 95% confidence interval) 0.7 (0.6 -0.9)] after adjustment for family history of allergy, ethnicity, sex and maternal education levels. No associations between Vegetable, Fruit and white Rice and Pasta, Cheese and Processed meat patterns were observed with any of the allergic outcomes in the first 18 and 36 months of life. Conclusion Maternal diet during pregnancy can influence the subsequent development of allergic outcomes in offspring.
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Publisher Copyright
Funding Info:
This research / project is supported by the National Medical Research Council - Translational and Clinical Research (TCR) Flagship Programme
Grant Reference no. : NMRC/TCR/004-NUS/2008

This research / project is supported by the National Medical Research Council - Translational and Clinical Research (TCR) Flagship Programme
Grant Reference no. : NMRC/TCR/012-NUHS/2014

This research / project is supported by the National Medical Research Council - Clinician Scientist Award
Grant Reference no. : NMRC/CSA/022/2010

This research / project is supported by the National Medical Research Council - HuJ
Grant Reference no. : NRF370062-HUJ-NUS

This research is supported by core funding from: Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, Agency for Science Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore
Grant Reference no. :
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The final, published version of this article is available at https://www.karger.com/?doi=[10.1159/000475497] ’
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