Impact of a High Protein Intake on the Plasma Metabolome in Elderly Males: 10 Week Randomized Dietary Intervention

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Impact of a High Protein Intake on the Plasma Metabolome in Elderly Males: 10 Week Randomized Dietary Intervention
Title:
Impact of a High Protein Intake on the Plasma Metabolome in Elderly Males: 10 Week Randomized Dietary Intervention
Journal Title:
Frontiers in Nutrition
Publication Date:
06 December 2019
Citation:
Durainayagam B, Mitchell CJ, Milan AM, Zeng N, Sharma P, Mitchell SM, Ramzan F, Knowles SO, Sjödin A, Wagner K-H, Roy NC, Fraser K and Cameron-Smith D (2019) Impact of a High Protein Intake on the Plasma Metabolome in Elderly Males: 10 Week Randomized Dietary Intervention. Front. Nutr. 6:180. doi: 10.3389/fnut.2019.00180
Abstract:
High protein diets may improve the maintenance of skeletal muscle mass in the elderly, although it remains less clear what broader impact such diets have on whole body metabolic regulation in the elderly. Non-targeted polar metabolomics analysis using HILIC HPLC-MS was used to profile the circulating plasma metabolome of elderly men (n = 31; 74.7 ± 4.0 years) who were randomized to consume for 10 weeks a diet designed to achieve either protein (RDA; 0.8·g−1·kg−1) or that doubled this recommend intake (2RDA; 1.6.g.kg−1). A limited number of plasma metabolites (n = 24) were significantly differentially regulated by the diet. These included markers of protein anabolism, which increased by the 2RDA diet, including; urea, creatine, and glutarylcarnitine. Whilst in response to the RDA diet; glutamine, glutamic acid, and proline were increased, relative to the 2RDA diet (p < 0.05). Metaboanalyst identified six major metabolic pathways to be influenced by the quantity of protein intake, most notably the arginine and proline pathways. Doubling of the recommended protein intake in older males over 10 weeks exerted only a limited impact on circulating metabolites, as determined by LC-MS. This metabolomic response was almost entirely due to increased circulating abundances of metabolites potentially indicative of altered protein anabolism, without evidence of impact on pathways for metabolic health.
License type:
Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
Funding Info:
This research / project is supported by the AgResearch Limited - Strategic Science Investment Fund -Nutritional strategies for an aging population
Grant Reference no. : A21246

This study was supported by New Zealand Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment International Relationships and the European Union (IRSES-318962-BIOAGE).
Description:
ISSN:
2296-861X