Selective transcriptional regulation by Myc in cellular growth control and lymphomagenesis

Selective transcriptional regulation by Myc in cellular growth control and lymphomagenesis
Title:
Selective transcriptional regulation by Myc in cellular growth control and lymphomagenesis
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Nature
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Publication Date:
09 July 2014
Citation:
Sabò, A., Kress, T., Pelizzola, M. et al. Selective transcriptional regulation by Myc in cellular growth control and lymphomagenesis. Nature 511, 488–492 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1038/nature13537
Abstract:
The c-myc proto-oncogene product, Myc, is a transcription factor that binds thousands of genomic loci1. Recent work suggested that rather than up- and downregulating selected groups of genes1, 2, 3, Myc targets all active promoters and enhancers in the genome (a phenomenon termed ‘invasion’) and acts as a general amplifier of transcription4, 5. However, the available data did not readily discriminate between direct and indirect effects of Myc on RNA biogenesis. We addressed this issue with genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and RNA expression profiles during B-cell lymphomagenesis in mice, in cultured B cells and fibroblasts. Consistent with long-standing observations6, we detected general increases in total RNA or messenger RNA copies per cell (hereby termed ‘amplification’)4, 5 when comparing actively proliferating cells with control quiescent cells: this was true whether cells were stimulated by mitogens (requiring endogenous Myc for a proliferative response)7, 8 or by deregulated, oncogenic Myc activity. RNA amplification and promoter/enhancer invasion by Myc were separable phenomena that could occur without one another. Moreover, whether or not associated with RNA amplification, Myc drove the differential expression of distinct subsets of target genes. Hence, although having the potential to interact with all active or poised regulatory elements in the genome4, 5, 9, 10, 11, Myc does not directly act as a global transcriptional amplifier4, 5. Instead, our results indicate that Myc activates and represses transcription of discrete gene sets, leading to changes in cellular state that can in turn feed back on global RNA production and turnover.
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PublisherCopyrights
Funding Info:
T.R.K. was supported by the Structured International Post Doc program of the European School of Molecular medicine. Work in the Amati lab was supported by grants from the European Research Council, the EU-FP7 Program (EuroSystem and MODHEP consortia), the Association for International Cancer Research (AICR), the Italian health ministry, Fondazione Cariplo and the Italian Association for Cancer Research (AIRC).
Description:
The author manuscript is available for free at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4110711/
ISSN:
0028-0836
1476-4687
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