Association between Self-Reported Eating Rate, Energy Intake, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in a Multi-Ethnic Asian Population

Association between Self-Reported Eating Rate, Energy Intake, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in a Multi-Ethnic Asian Population
Title:
Association between Self-Reported Eating Rate, Energy Intake, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in a Multi-Ethnic Asian Population
Other Titles:
Nutrients
Publication Date:
13 April 2020
Citation:
Teo, P.S., Whitton, C., Van Dam, R.M., Tan, L.W., L. and Forde C.G. (2020). Associations between self-reported eating rate, energy intake and cardiovascular risk factors in a multi-ethnic Asian population. Nutrients, 12(4), 1080. doi:10.3390/nu12041080.
Abstract:
Eating faster is associated with greater body mass index (BMI), but less is known about the relationships between eating rate, energy intake, body composition, and cardio-metabolic risk factors in different Asian ethnic groups. Using data from the Singapore Multi-Ethnic Cohort (n = 7011; 21–75 y), we investigated associations between self-reported eating rate (SRER), with energy intake, body composition, blood pressure, and blood lipids. SRER and lifestyle was assessed using interviewer-administered questionnaires. Multivariable models were used to examine the associations of SRER with energy intake, body composition, blood pressure, and blood lipids after adjusting for covariates. General and abdominal overweight were defined as BMI ≥ 23 kg/m2 and waist circumference >90 cm (men) and > 80 cm (women), respectively. On average, faster eaters (vs. slower eaters) consumed 105 kcal/day more (p = 0.034), had ~5 kg higher body weight (p < 0.001), 1.3 kg/m2 higher BMI (p < 0.001), and 3.1 cm larger waist-circumference (p < 0.001). Faster eaters had significantly higher blood pressure, circulating triglycerides, and total-to-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio than slower eaters. Faster eaters were twice as likely to develop general (multivariable-OR: 2.2; 95% CI, 1.8–2.6; p < 0.001), and abdominal (OR: 1.8; 95% CI, 1.5–2.2; p < 0.001) overweight than slower eaters. This association was observed across all subgroups by age, sex, and ethnicity. Findings suggest that SRER is a robust behavioral marker for increased risk of higher energy intake, obesity, and poor cardio-metabolic health, and a modifiable behavioral risk-factor for obesity prevention.
License type:
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Funding Info:
Grant title: Food Structure Engineering for Nutrition and Health Programme (FSENH) Type of grant: Industry Alignment Fund (IAF-PP) Grant Code: H18/01/a0/B11
Description:
ISSN:
2072-6643
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