Physical Form of Dietary Fat Alters Postprandial Substrate Utilization and Glycemic Response in Healthy Chinese Men

Physical Form of Dietary Fat Alters Postprandial Substrate Utilization and Glycemic Response in Healthy Chinese Men
Title:
Physical Form of Dietary Fat Alters Postprandial Substrate Utilization and Glycemic Response in Healthy Chinese Men
Other Titles:
The Journal of Nutrition
DOI:
10.3945/jn.116.246728
Keywords:
Publication Date:
10 May 2017
Citation:
Sze-Yen Tan, Elaine Peh, Evelyn Lau, Alejandro G Marangoni, Christiani Jeyakumar Henry, Physical Form of Dietary Fat Alters Postprandial Substrate Utilization and Glycemic Response in Healthy Chinese Men, The Journal of Nutrition, Volume 147, Issue 6, June 2017, Pages 1138–1144, https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.116.246728
Abstract:
Background: Dietary fats elicit various physiological responses, with the physical form of fat reported to alter fat digestion and absorption. Objectives: The primary aims were to compare the effects of dietary fat in 2 physical forms (liquid and oleogel) and 2 degrees of saturation (saturated and polyunsaturated) on postprandial energy expenditure (EE) and substrate oxidation, glycemia, and appetite. Methods: The study was a randomized, controlled crossover trial. Sixteen normal-weight, healthy Chinese men completed the study [mean 6 SD age: 28 6 6 y; body mass index (in kg/m2): 22.9 6 3.1]. After an overnight fast, participants had their body weight measured and entered an indirect whole-room calorimeter (WRC). After baseline measurements, participants consumed orange juice and rice porridge alone (control), with 22.25 g coconut oil or sunflower oil or with 25 g coconut oleogel or sunflower oleogel in random order with a 5-d washout period between treatments. EE, substrate oxidation, capillary blood glucose, and appetite were measured over 195 min in aWRC. Participants completed a meal challenge to assess appetite. Test meals effects were compared by using repeated-measures ANOVA. Results: Fat saturation did not affect all study outcomes significantly. When data were pooled based on the physical form of dietary fat, EE did not differ. However, significantly higher carbohydrate oxidation (P = 0.03) and a trend of lower fat oxidation (P = 0.07) were found after the liquid oil than after the oleogel or control treatments. Postprandial capillary glucose was also significantly lower after the liquid oil than after the oleogel or control treatments (P< 0.001). Appetite was not affected by the physical form and the saturation of dietary fats. Conclusions: The saturation of dietary fat did not affect postprandial glucose, EE, substrate oxidation, or appetite.
License type:
PublisherCopyrights
Funding Info:
This research is supported by core funding from Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences.
Description:
The full paper is available for free download at the publisher's URL: https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.116.246728
ISSN:
0022-3166
1541-6100
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