Associations of gestational glycemia and prepregnancy adiposity with offspring growth and adiposity in an Asian population

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Associations of gestational glycemia and prepregnancy adiposity with offspring growth and adiposity in an Asian population
Title:
Associations of gestational glycemia and prepregnancy adiposity with offspring growth and adiposity in an Asian population
Other Titles:
The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Publication Date:
30 September 2015
Citation:
Izzuddin M Aris, Shu E Soh, Mya Thway Tint, Seang Mei Saw, Victor S Rajadurai, Keith M Godfrey, Peter D Gluckman, Fabian Yap, Yap Seng Chong, Yung Seng Lee, Associations of gestational glycemia and prepregnancy adiposity with offspring growth and adiposity in an Asian population, The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 102, Issue 5, November 2015, Pages 1104–1112, https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.115.117614
Abstract:
Background: Maternal obesity and hyperglycemia increase risk of obesity and diabetes in offspring later in life. Objective: We examined the relation between gestational glycemia and prepregnancy body mass index (ppBMI) with offspring growth in an Asian mother-offspring cohort. Design: Pregnant mothers undertook a 75-g 2-h oral-glucose-tolerance test at 26–28 wk of gestation. In 937 singleton offspring, ≤9 serial measurements of weight and length were obtained from birth until 36 mo of age. Results: Gestational fasting plasma glucose (FPG) was positively associated with birth weight (B: 0.17; 95% CI: 0.10, 0.24; P < 0.001) and birth BMI (B: 0.15; 95% CI: 0.06, 0.40; P = 0.001) but not at ≥3 mo of age. In contrast, maternal ppBMI was positively associated with birth variables and conditional growth in weight and BMI in the first 36 mo of life. However, gestational FPG and prepregnancy obesity status interacted significantly for the association with offspring growth and overweight status in the first 36 mo of life (P-interaction < 0.01). In nonobese mothers, each unit increase in gestational FPG was associated with increased offspring weight (B: 0.08; 95% CI: 0.008, 0.16; P = 0.03) and BMI (B: 0.08; 95% CI: 0.003, 0.15; P = 0.04) as well as increased risk of overweight in the first 36 mo of life (OR: 1.36; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.68). However, in obese mothers, each unit increase in gestational FPG was associated with decreased offspring weight (B: −0.01; 95% CI: −0.02, −0.003) and BMI (B: −0.008; 95% CI: −0.01, −0.002) velocity (P < 0.01 for both) and decreased risk of overweight (OR: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.41, 0.86) in the first 36 mo of life. Conclusions: Prepregnancy adiposity was associated with offspring growth in early childhood. Although pooled analyses showed no demonstrable difference by 3 mo of age, there were contrasting and opposite associations of gestational glycemia with weight and BMI in the first 36 mo of life in offspring of nonobese and obese mothers separately. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01174875.
License type:
PublisherCopyrights
Funding Info:
Supported by the Translational Clinical Research Flagship Programme on Developmental Pathways to Metabolic Disease (NMRC/TCR/004-NUS/2008), which is funded by the National Research Foundation and administered by the National Medical Research Council, Singapore. KMG is supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) through the NIHR Southampton Biomedical Research Centre.
Description:
ISSN:
0002-9165
1938-3207
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