Maternal plasma phosphatidylcholine polyunsaturated fatty acids during pregnancy and offspring growth and adiposity

Maternal plasma phosphatidylcholine polyunsaturated fatty acids during pregnancy and offspring growth and adiposity
Title:
Maternal plasma phosphatidylcholine polyunsaturated fatty acids during pregnancy and offspring growth and adiposity
Other Titles:
PLEFA
Publication Date:
05 June 2017
Citation:
Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids, Volume 121, 21 - 29
Abstract:
Background: Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are essential for offspring development, but it is less clear whether pregnancy PUFA status affects growth and adiposity. Methods: In 985 mother-offspring pairs from the ongoing Singaporean GUSTO cohort, we analyzed the associations between offspring growth and adiposity outcomes until age 5 years and five PUFAs of interest, measured in maternal plasma at 26–28 weeks’ gestation: linoleic acid (LA), arachidonic acid, α-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). We measured fetal growth by ultrasound (n=924), neonatal body composition (air displacement plethysmography (n=252 at birth, and n=317 at age 10 days), and abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (n=317)), postnatal growth (n=979) and skinfold thicknesses (n=981). Results were presented as regression coefficients for a 5% increase in PUFA levels. Results: LA levels were positively associated with birthweight (β (95% CI): 0.04 (0.01, 0.08) kg), body mass index (0.13 (0.02, 0.25) kg/m2), head circumference (0.11 (0.03, 0.19) cm), and neonatal abdominal adipose tissue volume (4.6 (1.3, 7.8) mL for superficial subcutanous tissue, and 1.2 (0.1, 2.4) mL for internal tissue), but not with later outcomes. DHA levels, although not associated with birth outcomes, were related to higher postnatal length/height: 0.63 (0.09, 1.16) cm at 12 months and 1.29 (0.34, 2.24) cm at 5 years. Conclusions: LA was positively associated with neonatal body size, and DHA with child height. Maternal PUFA status during pregnancy may influence fetal and child growth and adiposity.
License type:
PublisherCopyrights
Funding Info:
This research was supported by the Singapore National Research Foundation under its Translational and Clinical Research (TCR) Flagship Programme and administered by the Singapore Ministry of Health’s National Medical Research Council (NMRC), Singapore- NMRC/TCR/004-NUS/2008; NMRC/TCR/012-NUHS/2014. Additional funding of the present study was provided by the Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, A*STAR and Nestec. KMG and PCC are supported by the National Institute for Health Research through the NIHR Southampton Biomedical Research Centre and KMG is supported by the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013), project EarlyNutrition under grant agreement number 289346. The sponsors were not involved in study design, data collection, analysis and interpretation, manuscript writing, and the decision to submit the article for publication.
Description:
The author manuscript is available freely at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5501311/
ISSN:
0952-3278
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