Predictors of Allergen Sensitization in Singapore Children From Birth to 3 Years

Predictors of Allergen Sensitization in Singapore Children From Birth to 3 Years
Title:
Predictors of Allergen Sensitization in Singapore Children From Birth to 3 Years
Other Titles:
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology
Keywords:
Publication Date:
24 October 2016
Citation:
Loo EX, Sim JZ, Goh A, et al. Predictors of allergen sensitization in Singapore children from birth to 3 years. Allergy Asthma Clin Immunol. 2016;12:56. Published 2016 Oct 24. doi:10.1186/s13223-016-0161-x
Abstract:
Background: Immune responses in allergic diseases begin with allergen sensitization, which usually occurs in childhood. Allergen sensitization involves a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors, and sensitization patterns may change with age. Objective: To determine the predictors of allergen sensitization in the first 3 years of life in the growing up in Singapore towards healthy outcomes (GUSTO) prospective birth cohort study. Methods: Interviewers collected information on demographics, family history of allergy, social and lifestyle factors, and the child’s health. We analyzed data from 849 children who completed skin prick testing (SPT) to inhalant allergens (house dust mites: Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Dermatophagoides farinae, and Blomia tropicalis) and food allergens (egg, peanut and cow’s milk) to assess risk factors for allergen sensitization at 18 months. To ensure that clinical phenotypes preceded allergen sensitization, we also analyzed data from 649 children who had a negative skin prick test at 18 months and completed skin prick testing at 36 months. Results: We observed a significant association between eczema reported before 18 months and a positive SPT at 18 months [aOR 4.5 (1.9–10.7)]. Ninety-five (14.6 %) children with negative SPTs at 18 months developed positive tests at 36 months. Onset of eczema before 18 months was associated with an increased risk of new allergen sensitization at 36 months among children non-sensitized at 18 months [aOR 3.4 (1.2–9.3)]. An association was seen between wheeze reported before 18 months and new allergen sensitization at 36 months [aOR 3.2 (1.1–9.1)]. We found no significant association, however, between rhinitis reported before 18 months and new allergen sensitization at 36 months. Conclusions: Early onset of eczema and wheeze are risk factors for later allergen sensitization, suggesting a possible increased susceptibility to allergen exposure through an impaired skin barrier or defective airway epithelium.
License type:
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Funding Info:
This research is supported by the Singapore National Research Foundation under its Translational and Clinical Research (TCR) Flagship Programme and administered by the Singapore Ministry of Health’s National Medical Research Council (NMRC), Singapore-NMRC/TCR/004-NUS/2008; NMRC/TCR/012-NUHS/2014. This work is also supported by the National Medical Research Council, NMRC/CSA/022/2010 and NRF370062-HUJ-NUS (Project 10). Additional funding is provided by the Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, Agency for Science Technology and Research (A*STAR), Singapore. KMG is funded by the NIHR through the NIHR Southampton Biomedical Research Centre. The funders are not involved in the design and conduct of the study, data analysis and preparation of manuscript.
Description:
ISSN:
1710-1484
1710-1492
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