Breakfast consumption modulates postprandial glycaemic, insulinaemic and NEFA response in pre-diabetic Asian males

Breakfast consumption modulates postprandial glycaemic, insulinaemic and NEFA response in pre-diabetic Asian males
Title:
Breakfast consumption modulates postprandial glycaemic, insulinaemic and NEFA response in pre-diabetic Asian males
Other Titles:
British Journal of Nutrition
Publication Date:
13 December 2019
Citation:
Abstract:
Breakfast consumption is associated with a variety of nutritional and lifestyle-related health outcomes. The objective of the present study was to investigate how the consumption of breakfast affected blood glucose, insulin and NEFA profiles. A lower postprandial blood glucose, insulin and NEFA response is associated with a lower risk of development of metabolic diseases. In a randomised crossover non-blind design, thirteen pre-diabetic Chinese adult males (BMI 26·7(SD 4·2) kg/m2) attended two sessions where they either consumed a high-glycaemic index breakfast or no breakfast consumption. Changes in glycaemic response over 27 h periods were measured using the Medtronic MiniMed iProTM2 continuous glucose monitoring system. Blood samples were collected using a peripheral venous catheter at fixed intervals for 3 h after the test meal and 3 h after standardised lunch consumption. Postprandial glucose, insulin and NEFA response was calculated as total AUC and incremental AUC using the trapezoidal rule that ignored the area under the baseline. It was found that breakfast consumption significantly decreased postprandial glucose, insulin and NEFA excursion response at lunch time (P= 0·001). Consumption of breakfast attenuated blood glucose profiles by minimising glycaemic excursions and reduced both insulinaemic and NEFA responses in pre-diabetic Asian males during the second meal. This simple dietary intervention may be a novel approach to help improve subsequent lunch glycaemic responses in Asians at high risk of developing diabetes.
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Funding Info:
The present study was funded by Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, grant no. H/17/01/a0/A11 and partially supported by General Mills Inc., grant no. GMI-783996.
Description:
ISSN:
0007-1145
1475-2662
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