High productivity purification of immunoglobulin G monoclonalantibodies on starch-coated magnetic nanoparticles by steric exclusion of polyethylene glycol

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High productivity purification of immunoglobulin G monoclonalantibodies on starch-coated magnetic nanoparticles by steric exclusion of polyethylene glycol
Title:
High productivity purification of immunoglobulin G monoclonalantibodies on starch-coated magnetic nanoparticles by steric exclusion of polyethylene glycol
Journal Title:
Journal of Chromatography A
Publication Date:
25 November 2013
Citation:
Gagnon P, Toh P, Lee J. High productivity purification of immunoglobulin G monoclonal antibodies on starch-coated magnetic nanoparticles by steric exclusion of polyethylene glycol. J Chromatogr A. 2014;1324:171‐180. doi:10.1016/j.chroma.2013.11.039
Abstract:
We achieved exceptionally high capacity capture of monoclonal IgG by adding 200 nm starch-coated magnetic particles as nucleation centers, adding polyethylene glycol (PEG), then collecting the particle-associated antibody in a magnetic field. Experimental data suggest that accretion of IgG begins on particle surfaces then continues with fusion of particle-centric accretions up to about 1mm in a process that closely parallels PEG precipitation. An embedded nanoparticle mass of 1.3% of the IgG mass is adequate to enable efficient magnetic collection of the associated IgG. Recovery of purified IgG averaged 98% up to loads of 78 mg of IgG per mg of particles. Converted to an equivalent volume of settled particles, this represents about 58 g IgG per mL of nanoparticles, which is roughly 1000 times higher than the average capacity of commercial protein A porous particles packed in columns. When applied to cell culture harvest clarified by centrifugation and microfiltration, performing the nanoparticle technique under physiological conditions permitted only a 10-fold reduction of host cell protein (HCP) contamination and IgG recovery less than 50%. Application of a more capable clarification method and operating the nanoparticle method at 0.5-1.0M NaCl supported more than 99% HCP reduction and 87% IgG recovery. The high salt concentration also dramatically diminished the influence of operating pH on selectivity. The nanoparticle step was followed by sample application without buffer exchange to a column packed with multimodal electropositive-hydrophobic particles that reduced HCP to 2 ppm. Aggregate content was reduced from 4.9 to 3.6% at the nanoparticle step, then to less than 0.05% at the multimodal step. The multimodal step also removed residual PEG. Overall IgG recovery was 69%. The ability of the system to achieve purity similar to protein A, but dramatically higher productivity than packed columns, suggests that the technique could evolve as a credible option for industrial purification of monoclonal antibodies.
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Funding Info:
This research is supported by the Exploit Technologies Pte Ltd, A*STAR, under its ETPL GAP-Funded (Project No. ETPL/12-R15GAP-0009)
Description:
ISSN:
0021-9673
1873-3778
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