Neuromodulatory circuit effects on Drosophila feeding behaviour and metabolism

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Neuromodulatory circuit effects on Drosophila feeding behaviour and metabolism
Title:
Neuromodulatory circuit effects on Drosophila feeding behaviour and metabolism
Other Titles:
Scientific Reports
Keywords:
Publication Date:
18 August 2017
Citation:
Eriksson, A., Raczkowska, M., Navawongse, R. et al. Neuromodulatory circuit effects on Drosophila feeding behaviour and metabolism. Sci Rep 7, 8839 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-08466-0
Abstract:
Animals have evolved to maintain homeostasis in a changing external environment by adapting their internal metabolism and feeding behaviour. Metabolism and behaviour are coordinated by neuromodulation; a number of the implicated neuromodulatory systems are homologous between mammals and the vinegar fly, an important neurogenetic model. We investigated whether silencing fly neuromodulatory networks would elicit coordinated changes in feeding, behavioural activity and metabolism. We employed transgenic lines that allowed us to inhibit broad cellular sets of the dopaminergic, serotonergic, octopaminergic, tyraminergic and neuropeptide F systems. The genetically-manipulated animals were assessed for changes in their overt behavioural responses and metabolism by monitoring eleven parameters: activity; climbing ability; individual feeding; group feeding; food discovery; both fed and starved respiration; fed and starved lipid content; and fed/starved body weight. The results from these 55 experiments indicate that individual neuromodulatory system effects on feeding behaviour, motor activity and metabolism are dissociated.
License type:
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Funding Info:
This work received major support for AE, RN, MR, DC, ZPW, JCS and ACC from A*STAR Joint Council Office grant 1231AFG030 awarded to ZPW and ACC. The authors were supported by a Biomedical Research Council block grant to the IMCB, and a Science and Engineering Research Council block grant to SIMTech. ACC received support from Duke-NUS Medical School, Joint Council Ofce grant 1431AFG120 and Ministry of Education grant MOE-2013-T2-2-054.
Description:
ISSN:
2045-2322
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