Human Islet Isolation and Distribution Efforts for Clinical and Basic Research

Human Islet Isolation and Distribution Efforts for Clinical and Basic Research
Title:
Human Islet Isolation and Distribution Efforts for Clinical and Basic Research
Other Titles:
OBM Transplantation
Keywords:
Publication Date:
21 June 2019
Citation:
Ng NHJ, Tan WX, Koh YX, Teo AKK. Human Islet Isolation and Distribution Efforts for Clinical and Basic Research. OBM Transplantation 2019;3(2):31; doi:10.21926/obm.transplant.1902068
Abstract:
The ability to routinely and reproducibly obtain purified human islets has facilitated substantial progress in providing a safe and reliable treatment option for adult patients of type 1 diabetes. The availability of human islets for basic research has also significantly improved the understanding of the biology of human islets, and consequently the pathophysiology of diabetes. Presently, about 70 human islet isolation centers are known to exist around the world, in addition to multiple coordinated human islet distribution programs, that facilitate the exchange of knowledge and sharing of this precious resource. This review summarizes the steps involved in the isolation and dissemination of human islets, and discusses key considerations with respect to the major challenges faced during this process. Another important objective of this review is to summarize the ongoing efforts for the distribution of human islets at the regional, national, and international levels. This review also highlights the value of human islets for clinical transplantation as well as basic research, particularly by highlighting selected studies that have significantly improved our understanding of human islet biology.
License type:
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Funding Info:
N.H.J.N. is supported by the National Medical Research Council (NMRC) Open Fund-Young Individual Research Grant (OF-YIRG) OFYIRG18May. W.X.T. is supported by the NUS Research Scholarship. Y.X.K. and A.K.K.T. are supported by the Lee Foundation Grant SHTX/LFG/002/2018, FY2019 SingHealth Duke-NUS Surgery Academic Clinical Programme Research Support Programme Grant and SingHealth Duke-NUS Transplant Centre – Multi-Visceral Transplant Fund Award. A.K.K.T. is further supported by the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB), A*STAR, the JCO Career Development Award (CDA) 15302FG148, NMRC OF-YIRG OFYIRG16may014, MRC Research Grant, A*STAR ETPL Gap Funding ETPL/18-GAP005-R20H, Skin Innovation Grant SIG18011, NMRC OF-LCG/DYNAMO, Precision Medicine and Personalised Therapeutics Joint Research Grant 2019 and Industry Alignment Fund-Industry Collaboration Project (IAF-ICP).
Description:
ISSN:
2577-5820
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