Phosphonate-based metal–organic framework derived Co–P–C hybrid as an efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution reaction

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Phosphonate-based metal–organic framework derived Co–P–C hybrid as an efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution reaction
Title:
Phosphonate-based metal–organic framework derived Co–P–C hybrid as an efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution reaction
Other Titles:
ACS Catalysis
Publication Date:
27 July 2017
Citation:
Zhou, T. H.; Du, Y. H.; Wang, D. P.; Yin, S. M.; Tu, W. G.; Chen, Z.; Borgna, A.; Xu, R., Phosphonate-based metal–organic framework derived Co–P–C hybrid as an efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen evolution reaction. ACS Catalysis 2017, 7, 6000-6007.
Abstract:
Cobalt phosphate is considered to be one of the most active catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in neutral or near-neutral pH media, but only a few transition-metal phosphates are investigated in alkaline media, probably due to their poor intrinsic electrical conductivity and/or tendency to aggregate. Herein, in situ-formed cobalt phosphate decorated with N-doped graphitic carbon was prepared using phosphonate-based metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) as the precursor. It can serve as a highly active OER catalyst in alkaline media, affording a current density of 10 mA cm–2 at a small overpotential of 215 mV on the Ni foam. A combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and high-resolution XPS elucidates the origin of the high activity. Our observations unveil that cobalt diphosphate having the distorted metal coordination geometry with long Co–O and Co–Co distances is mainly responsible for the high OER activity. These results not only demonstrate the potential of a low-cost OER catalyst derived from phosphonate-based MOF but also open a promising avenue into the exploration of highly active and stable catalysts toward replacing noble metals as oxygen evolution electrocatalysts.
License type:
PublisherCopyrights
Funding Info:
This work was supported by the National Research Foundation (NRF), Prime Minister’s Office, Singapore under its Campus for Research Excellence and Technological Enterprise (CREATE) program: The Singapore-Berkeley Research Initiative for Sustainable Energy (SinBeRISE) and the Cambridge Centre for Carbon Reduction in Chemical Technology (C4T).
Description:
This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in ACS Catalysis, copyright © American Chemical Society after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see https://doi.org/10.1021/acscatal.7b00937.
ISSN:
2155-5435
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