Neural representations of movement intentions during brain-controlled self-motion

Neural representations of movement intentions during brain-controlled self-motion
Title:
Neural representations of movement intentions during brain-controlled self-motion
Other Titles:
2015 7th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)
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Publication Date:
22 April 2015
Citation:
R. So et al., "Neural representations of movement intentions during brain-controlled self-motion," 2015 7th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER), Montpellier, 2015, pp. 228-231. doi: 10.1109/NER.2015.7146601
Abstract:
Using a brain-machine interface (BMI), a non-human primate (NHP) was trained to control a mobile robotic platform in real time using spike activity from the motor cortex, enabling self-motion through brain-control. The decoding model was initially trained using neural signals recorded when the NHP controlled the platform using a joystick. Using this decoding model, we compared the performance of the BMI during brain control with and without the use of a dummy joystick, and found that the success ratio dropped by 40% and time taken increased by 45% when the dummy joystick was removed. Performance during full brain control was only restored after a recalibration of the decoding model. We aimed to understand the differences in the underlying neural representations of movement intentions with and without the use of a dummy joystick, and showed that there were significant changes in both directional tuning, as well as global firing rates. These results indicate that the strategies used by the NHP for self-motion were different depending on whether a dummy joystick was present. We propose that a recalibration of the decoding model is an important step during the implementation of a BMI system for self-motion.
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PublisherCopyrights
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Description:
(c) 2015 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other users, including reprinting/ republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted components of this work in other works.
ISBN:
978-1-4673-6389-1
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