Development of Silicon Probe With Acute Study on In Vivo Neural Recording and Implantation Behavior Monitored by Integrated Si-Nanowire Strain Sensors

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Development of Silicon Probe With Acute Study on In Vivo Neural Recording and Implantation Behavior Monitored by Integrated Si-Nanowire Strain Sensors
Title:
Development of Silicon Probe With Acute Study on In Vivo Neural Recording and Implantation Behavior Monitored by Integrated Si-Nanowire Strain Sensors
Journal Title:
JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS
Keywords:
Publication Date:
01 October 2015
Citation:
Songsong Zhang; Shih-Cheng Yen; Zhuolin Xiang; Lun-De Liao; Dim-Lee Kwong; Chengkuo Lee, "Development of Silicon Probe With Acute Study on In Vivo Neural Recording and Implantation Behavior Monitored by Integrated Si-Nanowire Strain Sensors," in Microelectromechanical Systems, Journal of , vol.24, no.5, pp.1303-1313, Oct. 2015
Abstract:
The silicon probe with highly P-doped Si electrodes was realized on 8-in Silicon on insulator wafer through standard Complementary metal-oxide semiconductor process. By leveraging the same thin Si device layer (∼100 nm), the built-in piezo resistive Si-nano wires (SiNWs) configured in full bridge structure were also equipped along the probe shank for strain sensing. After additional coatings of nano composite (Carbon nano tubes + Au nano particles) on silicon electrodes, the functionality of neural recording was validated with a low noise level (<20 μV) during in vivo neural recording on rat brain (CA1 region). The additional capability of monitoring probe mechanical behavior was first verified through the probe buckling experiments and further examined with implantations on rat brain (S1 region). Besides the large buckling mechanics, the physiological brain micro motion (e.g., caused by respiration) was successfully picked up by integrated SiNWs strain sensors, which would provide the research platform to practically understand the correlation between the electrical neural signal and the brain micromotion.
License type:
PublisherCopyrights
Funding Info:
Description:
(c) 2015 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other users, including reprinting/ republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted components of this work in other works.
ISSN:
1057-7157
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